The Darning-Needle 5

One day a couple of street boys were paddling in the gutter, for they sometimes found old nails, farthings, and other treasures. It was dirty work, but they took great pleasure in it.

 

“Hallo!” cried one, as he pricked himself with the darning-needle, “here’s a fellow for you.”

 

“I am not a fellow, I am a young lady,” said the darning-needle; but no one heard her.

 

The sealing-wax had come off, and she was quite black; but black makes a person look slender, so she thought herself even finer than before.

 

“Here comes an egg-shell sailing along,” said one of the boys; so they stuck the darning-needle into the egg-shell.

 

“White walls, and I am black myself,” said the darning-needle, “that looks well; now I can be seen, but I hope I shall not be sea-sick, or I shall break again.” She was not sea-sick, and she did not break. “It is a good thing against sea-sickness to have a steel stomach, and not to forget one’s own importance. Now my sea-sickness has past: delicate people can bear a great deal.”

 

Crack went the egg-shell, as a waggon passed over it. “Good heavens, how it crushes!” said the darning-needle. “I shall be sick now. I am breaking!” but she did not break, though the wagon went over her as she lay at full length; and there let her lie.

 

The End

By: Hans Christian Andersen

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